The Brooklyn New School is committed to academic and personal success for all students. We believe that children are creators of meaning. They are naturally thoughtful and curious, and they work to gain understanding of the world they inhabit. When the adults who care for children foster this effort, children become life-long learners.
 
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Weekly Letter 6.19.17

Dear Families:

 

It’s 1999.  Our school is moving.  We will no longer live on 18th Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenue, but will move to the fifth floor of this huge building at 610 Henry Street.  We are a school in transition and we need a first grade teacher.  

 

That year, we conduct the interviews in my house, sitting around the dining room table.  And one day, a woman arrives.   Her name is Jennifer Hardy.  

 

Weekly Letter 6.12.2017

Dear Families:

 

Until twelve  years ago, BNS held its Earth Day Celebration on Saturdays. Back then, a teacher, Beth Vertucci pointed out that the event should be open to all students.  Thus the idea for our Earth Day Celebration was born.   The BNS Earth Day was renamed  Ecorama, a word coined by one of our kids.  Many thanks to Barbara and Johanna for inspiring all of us last Friday during the annual event.    Seeing how much our students know about caring for each other and planet earth gives hope for the future.  

 

Weekly Letter 6.5.17

 

 Dear Families:

 

Starting in Kindergarten, all students visit our BNS/BCS Library on a weekly basis.  In addition to browsing and borrowing books, each grade is engaged in curriculum involving developmentally appropriate Social Emotional and/or Social Justice based themes.  

 

This year, Grade 4 has been reading about Social Activists, past and current, from all over our world.  A question they frequently revisit is, "How are you making our world a better place?"  To spark our fourth graders' activism, three BNS alumni were invited to be on our Youth Activist Panel.

Weekly Letter 5.22.17

Dear Families:

 

It was over a month ago when we started our day with some fifth graders reading excerpts from Martin Luther King’s famous speech, Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence, delivered at Riverside Church fifty years ago.   It was just a few minutes in another busy day, but its impact was felt.  As the children read these famous lines, their younger peers listened.  

 

Weekly Letter 5.18.17

Dear Families:

 

If your child doesn’t know how to ride a bike, I highly recommend participating in Learn To Bike Day, which will be taking place this  Saturday from 2-4 pm in the small yard (Coles Street) at BNS.  This is a free workshop run by BikeNYC.  Children ages five to thirteen are welcome.  Register here http://bit.ly/BNSride.   See poster below.

Learn to Ride!

Learn to Ride

Weekly Letter 5.11.17

Dear Families:

 

On Tuesday, May 9, 2017, at 8:14 AM, I became the proud grandmother of Diego Allanbrook Ramirez, born at Mount Sinai West.  Meanwhile,  downtown at NYU at 5:16 PM,  fourth grade teacher Nneka gave birth to Aaron Jacob Kurlandski.  (Both boys arrived a little earlier than expected.)   

 

These two boys are one of many in our BNS family.  

 

Weekly Letter 5.3.17

Dear Families:

 

Spring is in the air.  You can feel it on Rapelye Street as the warm wind blows.  You can feel it in the schoolyard as children play in the mud during green recess.  You can feel it at lunch time as hundreds of children complete their mighty milers trek around the school perimeter.  And you can feel it in the classroom where students and teachers are immersed in work.  Their investigations are rich, their trips are frequent, each of them in their own way (children and adults) is becoming an expert in their field of study.  

Weekly Letter 4.24.17

Dear Families:

 

Today our third graders got to school nice and early in order to embark on the annual third grade trek to Camp Speers Eljabar,  a YMCA camp in the Poconos.  There is something incredibly exciting about this: Eight year olds going away from home, ready to be independent and a part of a community other than family.  In the next three days, these young people will learn that they can  separate from their parents, take care of themselves and become experts on bogs, waterfalls, canoeing and building shelters.  

 

Weekly Letter 4.19.17

Dear Families:

 

Just before vacation, Jennifer Donlin, our early childhood art teacher covered for Paola in the art room.  She introduced some third and fourth grade classes to the Japanese concept of Kintsugi, a method for repairing broken ceramics with a lacquer mixed with gold, silver, or platinum.  The idea is simple: Damage does not end an object’s life.  Repairs are celebrated as being part of the object’s history and symbolize healing and growth.  The end result is stronger, more beautiful and valuable than the original unbroken object.  

 

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